November 2012

Understand : What is Paid Up Value in your Insurance Policy

What is Paid Up Value , Insurance Policy, Surrender Value, Life Insurance Concepts, Policy Lapse, Assignment, Nomination, .

Awareness precedes success

Most of the Insurance Policy Holders are unaware of the concept of Surrender Value and Paid  Up Value in case of lapse of a policy for any reason. This note with an example will help understand the concept. 

Guaranteed Surrender Value 

Under Sec 113 of Insurance Act 1938 if a person discontinues a policy, the insurer will not be allowed to forfeit all premiums paid. In every premium there will be an element of savings element accruing in a reserve fund. Insurance Act 1938 stipulates that the insurer should pay a guaranteed surrender value, if the premiums are paid for a minimum period of 3 years. Some Insurers pay more than the amount stipulated by the Act and this is called Special Surrender values. 

Paid Up Value 

When policy lapses after 3 years the Insurer will reduce the sum assured to a sum in the same ratio as the number of years premiums paid, bearers to total number of years in term of the policy. 

If Mr X. had taken a policy for 32 years for 10 Lakhs and he has paid the premium for 8 years only, then he would have paid for the term only. The Insurer offers to pay the Sum Assured, due payable on the maturity date or death if earlier as Paid up value that is Rs. 2,50,000. 

Reduced Sum Assured (RSA is the Reduced Sum Assured or the Paid up value) =
(Total number of years premium paid X sum assured) / (Total term of the policy)

Policies are with Profits or Participating polices wherein the policy holder will be eligible to get share of surplus of insurer called the bonus. 

No bonuses will be added to the sum assured of policies without profits or non – participating policies. 

 In case of policies wherein bonus eligibility is available, the sum total of Reduced Sum Assured + bonus allocated, shall be the Paid up Value. 

Where there is no bonus eligibility for the policy, the Reduced Sum Assured shall be the paid up value. 

Premiums are paid in advance in Insurance transaction. So the policy will be in force for the term depending on the mode of payment. Obviously, a monthly mode will keep the policy alive for 1 month, in quarterly it will be for 3 months, Half yearly for 6 months and yearly for 1 year.

Mr. X had taken a Half yearly mode of payment for 10 Lakhs with profits for 32 years term. The policy had commenced on 28th March 2002. He paid the premiums due on 28th September 2009. Due to certain financial constraints he could not pay further. Upon lapse of his policy due to non payment of premiums, not all of the money paid is lost.

What is Paid Up Value , Insurance Policy, Surrender Value, Life Insurance Concepts, Policy Lapse, Assignment, Nomination,

 

 

 

 

Reduced Sum Assured = Rs 2,50,000
Add Bonus Accrued = say 1,60,000
Total Paid Up = Rs 4,10,000

How much Life insurance is another article which you will find useful….

October 2012

How do you compare and evaluate Mutual Fund Performance

 Risk-adjusted Returns, Evaluating Mutual Fund Performance, Sharpe Ratio, Treynor Ratio, Beta, Alpha, tracking error, Index funds, .

Risk-Adjusted Return is one of the concept investors should be aware when comparing returns of mutual funds.  

One way of comparing the returns between two different funds is to look at the their relative returns over a period. However, a weakness of this approach is that it does not differentiate between two schemes that have assumed different levels of risk in pursuit of the same investment objective.

It is possible that although two schemes share the benchmark, their risk levels will differ, and sometimes quite dramatically as well. Evaluating performance, purely based on relative returns, may be unfair towards the fund manager who has taken lower risk but generated the same return as a peer.

An alternative approach to evaluating the performance of the fund manager is through the risk reward relationship.

The underlying principle is that return ought to be commensurate with the risk taken.

A fund manager, who has taken higher risk, ought to earn a better return to justify the risk taken. A fund manager who has earned a lower return may be able to justify it through the lower risk taken. Such evaluations are conducted through Risk-adjusted Returns.

There are various measures of risk-adjusted returns. We’ll look at the three most commonly used :

Sharpe Ratio

An investor can invest with the government, and earn a risk-free rate of return (Rf). T-Bill index is a good measure of this risk-free return.

Through investment in a scheme, a risk is taken, and a return earned (Rs).

The difference between the two returns i.e. Rs – Rf is called risk premium. It is like a premium that the investor has earned for the risk taken, as compared to government’s risk-free return.

This risk premium is to be compared with the risk taken. Sharpe Ratio uses Standard Deviation as a measure of risk. It is calculated as

(Rs minus Rf) ÷ Standard Deviation

Thus, if risk free return is 5%, and a scheme with standard deviation of 0.5 earned a return of 7%, its Sharpe Ratio would be (7% – 5%) ÷ 0.5 i.e. 4%.

Sharpe Ratio is effectively the risk premium per unit of risk. Higher the Sharpe Ratio, better the scheme is considered to be. Care should be taken to do Sharpe Ratio comparisons between comparable schemes. For example, Sharpe Ratio of an equity scheme is not to be compared with the Sharpe Ratio of a debt scheme.

Treynor Ratio

Like Sharpe Ratio, Treynor Ratio too is a risk premium per unit of risk.

Computation of risk premium is the same as was done for the Sharpe Ratio. However, for risk, Treynor Ratio uses Beta.

Treynor Ratio is thus calculated as: (Rf minus Rs) ÷ Beta

Thus, if risk free return is 5%, and a scheme with Beta of 1.2 earned a return of 8%, its Treynor Ratio would be (8% – 5%) ÷ 1.2 i.e. 2.5%.

Higher the Treynor Ratio, better the scheme is considered to be. Since the concept of Beta is more relevant for diversified equity schemes, Treynor Ratio comparisons should ideally be restricted to such schemes.

Alpha

The Beta of the market, by definition is 1. An index scheme mirrors the index. Therefore, the index scheme too would have a Beta of 1, and it ought to earn the same return as the market. The difference between an index fund’s return and the market return, as seen earlier, is the tracking error.

Non-index schemes too would have a level of return which is in line with its higher or lower beta as compared to the market. Let us call this the optimal return.

The difference between a scheme’s actual return and its optimal return is its Alpha – a measure of the fund manager’s performance. Positive alpha is indicative of out-performance by the fund manager; negative alpha might indicate under- performance.

Since the concept of Beta is more relevant for diversified equity schemes, Alpha should ideally be evaluated only for such schemes.

These quantitative measures are based on historical performance, which may or may not be replicated.

Such quantitative measures are useful pointers. However, blind belief in these measures, without an understanding of the underlying factors, is dangerous. While the calculations are arithmetic – they can be done by a novice; scheme evaluation is an art – the job of an expert. 

Source : NISM
 
More on Mutual Funds

September 2012

Procedure for Transmission of Shares, In the Event of Death of the Shareholder

Procedure for Transmission of Shares,in the Event of Death of the Shareholder , Stock Investing, SEBI India

Life is uncertain..But Death is certain

Recently, an acquaintance had to undergo the process of transmission of shares when she lost her spouse to an unfortunate mishap. It is good to be aware of the process of transmission as documented by SEBI. I am putting this here for the benefit of our readers.

“Transmission” is the terminology used for this procedure that means passing of property in shares to the legal heirs. In the event of death of the shareholder procedure for transmission of shares is as follows;

 Where there is a nominee;

For shares in demat mode, you have to send to the Depository Participant (DP);

  1. Notarized copy of the death certificate
  2. Duly filled Transmission Request Form (TRF).

For physical shares, you may be requested to send any of the below documents to the Registrar and Share Transfer Agent (RTA);

  1. Original Share certificates.
  2. Duly filled Transmission Request Form (TRF).
  3. An affidavit / declaration by the nominee declaring his rights.
  4. Notarized copy of the death certificate.

Where there is no nomination: (Part A)

 Shares held in Demat mode;

 Where value of the shares is upto Rs. 100,000, one or more of the following documents is to be furnished to the DP;

  1. Notarized copy of the death certificate
  2. Transmission Request Form(TRF)
  3. Affidavit – to the effect of the claim of legal ownership to the shares,
  4. Deed of indemnity – Indemnifying the depository and Depository Participants (DP)
  5. NOC* from legal heir(s), if applicable or family settlement deed duly executed by all legal heirs of the deceased beneficial owner.

Where value is more than Rs 100,000, the Depository Participants (DP) may additionally insist on one or more of the following documents;

  1. Surety form
  2. Succession certificate
  3. Probated will

Shares held in Physical mode:

 Where the Shares are in physical mode, The RTA (Registrar/Share Transfer Agent) may insist on any of following documents;

  1. Original Share certificates.
  2. Duly filled Transmission Request Form (TRF).
  3. Notarized copy of the death certificate.
  4. Succession certificate or
  5. Probate or letter of administration duly attested by Court Officer or Notary

 * In case of multiple successors, NOC from non-applicants shall be recorded on the share transmission form of the applicant instead of insisting separate share transmission form from each of the successors.

 Transmission of shares is required to be done within a period of one month for share held in physical form and within seven days for shares held in Demat form, from the date of lodgment of the Transmission Request Form by listed companies.

Sources: SEBI