Tag - Time Value of Money

June 2016

Types of Investors – What type are you?

Types of Investors , Conservative, Aggressive, Risk taker, Risk Profiling, Risk Averse, Savers, Specialists, Speculators

I came across this good article at http://www.threetypes.com/philosophy/investor-types.shtml and wanted to share. It essentially discusses the various types of Investors viz : Savers, Speculators and Specialists and then goes on to explain how becoming a Specialist, is something which generates immense wealth over lesser periods of time , but which also requires tremendous efforts on the part of the investor.

Go ahead and decide which type of investor you are and then invest accordingly. Enjoy Investing…..

Savers

Savers are those people who spend the majority of their life slowly growing their “nest egg” in order to ensure a comfortable retirement. Savers explicitly choose not to focus their time on investing or investment strategy; they either entrust others to dictate their investments (money managers or financial planners) or they simply diversify their investments across a number of different asset classes (they create “a diversified portfolio”). For those who create a diversified portfolio, their primary investing strategy is to hedge each of their investments with other “non-correlated” investments, and ultimately generate a consistent annual return in the range of 3-8% (after adjusting for inflation). Those who entrust their money to professional money managers generally get the same level of diversification, and the same 3-8% returns (minus the management fees).

Savers seek low-risk growth of their capital, and in return, are willing to accept a relatively low rate of return. While there is certainly nothing wrong with striving for consistent returns, what the Saver is doing is really no different than putting their money in a Certificate of Deposit, albeit with slightly higher returns. The bulk of Savers are investing for long-term financial security and retirement. They start saving in their 20’s and 30’s by putting money in 401(k) accounts, mutual funds, and other diversified investments, and in 30 or 40 years, they have enough to retire on.

Savers rely in a single force to grow their capital: time. Because their rate of return is generally consistent, a Saver’s primary mechanism to achieve wealth is to invest and wait. In fact, Savers often use The Rule of 72 to calculate long-term investment growth and plan their retirement. While passive investing is an almost surefire path to a comfortable retirement, it also generally means 30-50 years of work to get to that point.

Speculators

Unlike Savers, Speculators choose to take control of their investments, and not rely solely on “time” to get to the point of financial independence. Speculators are happy to forgo the relatively low returns of a diversified portfolio in order to try to achieve the much higher returns of targeted investments. Instead of just spreading their money across stock funds, bonds, real estate funds, and a variety of other asset categories, Speculators are always looking for an investing edge. Perhaps they get a hot stock tip and try to cash in on the next Google. Or perhaps they hear about all the real estate investors who have made a bundle flipping houses, so they go out and buy the first run-down house they see.

Speculators recognize that they can have higher returns than Savers, and are willing to do or try anything to get those returns. They’re not scared to throw some money in an Options account and try their hand at derivatives trading; or run out and buy a bunch of inventory from a wholesaler they know and open up an eBay selling account. Speculators are always looking for the next great investment; for them, it’s all about being in the right place at the right time, and taking a chance on getting rich. If today’s investment doesn’t work out, there will always be another one tomorrow. (more…)

May 2012

Present Value (PV) Basics….Formulae

Present Value, PV, Formulae, Time Value of Money, Tutorials, basics, Money, Investment fundamentals, Cash Flow

Terms uses :
PV = Present Value;
A = Annuity;
r = interest rate;
g = growth rate;
n = number of periods;
CF = Cash Flow;
 
“A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush” – Miguel de Cervantes
 
If someone owes you 10,000/- , it is advantageous to get the money today If you get this money today:
–> You could earn interest and invest it and you will receive this quantity plus some other amount in the future.
–> You can use it to pay your debts and therefore, lower the interest amount paid on your debt.
–> Or you can spend it and enjoy it as you wish.
 
More on Time Value of Money here

August 2010

What and How of Nifty Index!!!

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One of my friend recently just wanted to get an idea about Nifty and How it is calculated. I am presenting some basic facts about Nifty here….

Background of Nifty

S&P CNX Nifty is a well diversified 50 stock index accounting for 21 sectors of the economy. It is used for a variety of purposes such as benchmarking fund portfolios, index based derivatives and index funds.

S&P CNX Nifty is owned and managed by India Index Services and Products Ltd. (IISL), which is a joint venture between NSE and CRISIL. IISL is India’s first specialised company focused upon the index as a core product. IISL has a Marketing and licensing agreement with Standard & Poor’s (S&P), who are world leaders in index services.

  • The traded value for the last six months of all Nifty stocks is approximately 44.89% of the traded value of all stocks on the NSE
  • Nifty stocks represent about 58.64% of the total market capitalization as on March 31, 2008.
  • Impact cost of the S&P CNX Nifty for a portfolio size of Rs.2 crore is 0.15%
  • S&P CNX Nifty is professionally maintained and is ideal for derivatives trading

What and How of Nifty Index, How is stock selected in Index, Sensex, India Index Services and Products Ltd. (IISL)NSE, CRISIL, Liquidity,  Impact Cost, Floating Stock, index calculation

How Stocks are selected :

The constituents and the criteria for the selection judge the effectiveness of the index. Selection of the index set is based on the following criteria:

Liquidity (Impact Cost)

For inclusion in the index, the security should have traded at an average impact cost of 0.50% or less during the last six months for 90% of the observations for a basket size of Rs. 2 Crores.

Impact cost is cost of executing a transaction in a security in proportion to the weightage of its market capitalisation as against the index market capitalisation at any point of time. This is the percentage mark up suffered while buying / selling the desired quantity of a security compared to its ideal price (best buy + best sell) / 2

Floating Stock

Companies eligible for inclusion in S&P CNX Nifty should have atleast 10% floating stock. For this purpose, floating stock shall mean stocks which are not held by the promoters and associated entities (where identifiable) of such companies.

Others

a) A company which comes out with a IPO will be eligible for inclusion in the index, if it fulfills the normal eligiblity criteria for the index like impact cost, market capitalisation and floating stock, for a 3 month period instead of a 6 month period.

b) Replacement of Stock from the Index:

A stock may be replaced from an index for the following reasons:

i. Compulsory changes like corporate actions, delisting etc. In such a scenario, the stock having largest market capitalization and satisfying other requirements related to liquidity, turnover and free float will be considered for inclusion.

ii. When a better candidate is available in the replacement pool, which can replace the index stock i.e. the stock with the highest market capitalization in the replacement pool has at least twice the market capitalization of the index stock with the lowest market capitalization.

With respect to (2) above, a maximum of 10% of the index size (number of stocks in the index) may be changed in a calendar year. Changes carried out for (2) above are irrespective of changes, if any, carried out for (1) above.

And Finally how is the index calculation done

S&P CNX Nifty is computed using market capitalization weighted method, wherein the level of the index reflects the total market value of all the stocks in the index relative to a particular base period. The method also takes into account constituent changes in the index and importantly corporate actions such as stock splits, rights, etc without affecting the index value.

Source : NSE

July 2010

The Simple rules to Successful Investing – Part 1

The Simple rules to Successful Investing , Understanding Investing, Stocks, Mutual Funds, Tax, Insurance, Estate, Wills.

“No amount of talking or reading can teach you swimming. You will have to get in the water.”

There are these little general rules which are applicable and useful for decision making and taking actions. And these simple rules are applicable in so many aspects of life, they are just some small reminders, some common-sense stuff which are really useful.

And yes most of them are applicable in investment planning as well.

a. Perfect Plan – Forget it.There is no such thing as a perfect investment plan and no such thing as a perfect time. The right time is now. Tomorrow is and always will be uncertain. Perfectionism is the enemy of action. Do not let perfect investment plan or a perfect time to invest stop you from starting.

b. Analysis Paralysis – Too much thinking will often result in getting stuck.Some thinking is good — it’s good to have a clear picture of where you’re going or why you’re doing this — but don’t get stuck thinking. Just do.

c. Get the Broad Picture and Start. You need to get the broad picture in your mind. You need to understand your future requirements or what do you want to achieve (goals). You need to know the time you have to meet those requirements. And, then you should have the broad plan to meet the goals. Once you have the broad picture. Get going.
All the planning will take you nowhere unless you take that first step, no matter how small it is.

d. Keep things Simple and take Small Steps. Small steps always work. Little tiny blows can break down that mountain. And then each step counts. Keep the big picture in mind, but start by taking small steps.

Understand the advantage of Investing Early here.

The Little Rules to successful action To be contd … Part 2.

February 2010

What is Time Value of Money

What is Time Value of Money

“A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush” – Miguel de Cervantes

The time value of money is one of the most important concepts in finance. Money that is in possession today is more valuable than future payments because today’s money can be invested to earn positive returns in future.The understanding of Time Value of Money leads to better decision making in some of the major financial decisions like — calculating sum assured requirements for your life insurance needs, computing monies which will be required for child education/wedding in future, corpus needed to fund retirement, comparing alternative investment decisions, comparing house lease v/s buy decisions, horrendous impact of carrying credit card debts etc.

What is time Value?What is Time Value of Money, Present Value , Future Value, Compound Interest, Time and their Relationship,

Money has time value. The value of Rs. 1 today is more worthy than the value of Rs. 1 tomorrow. This economic principle recognizes that the passage of time affects the value of money. This relationship between time and money is called the ‘Time Value of Money’.

If someone owes you Rs 10,000/- , it is advantageous to get the money today If you get this money today:
–> You could earn interest and invest it and you will receive this quantity plus some other amount in the future.
–> You can use it to pay your debts and therefore, lower the interest amount paid on your debt.
–> Or you can spend it and enjoy it as you wish.

Understanding Present Value , Future Value, Compound Interest, Time and their Relationship:

A sum of money today is called a present value (PV). A sum of money at a future time is termed a future value (FV).

The time period in between the present and future value can be no of years, no of months, no of quarters or any unit of period. (n).

The interest rate or growth rate in which the present value can be employed . This is the interest rate per period.(i) The effects of value versus time is best usually described by compound interest. Change in Value over time is impacted by factors like inflation, tax rates , discounting rates etc.

Future Value is calculated as follows : Future Value (FV) = Present Value (PV) * (1 + i) ^ n

Alternatively, given a future value then,

Present Value can be calculated as follows : Present Value (PV) = Future Value (FV) / (1 + i) ^ n

Compounding

Compounding is the mathematical procedure for determining “future value” and is virtually the reverse of discounting

Discounting

Discounting is the mathematical procedure for determining “present value”.

Some Examples :
1. If you invest Rs 1,000 today at an interest rate of 10 percent, how much will it grow to be after 5 years?
FV = 1000 * (1 + .1) ^ 5 = Rs 1,610.51

2. If you were given an option to get Rs 1,00,000 , six years hence OR option of receiving Rs 55,000 now. What will you choose.
In this case, you bring down the future value to the present value and then make a decision (or judgement). Let us assume a discounting rate of 12%.

So, PV = 1,00,000 / (1 + .12) ^ 6 = Rs 50,663.11.

Option A Present Value comes to Rs 50,663.11 and Option B is Rs 55,000. And the choice becomes obvious. In this way different rates can be used to make alternative quality decisions and arrive at decisions quantitatively.

3.If you invest Rs 11,000 in a mutual fund today, and it grows to be Rs 50,000 after 8 years, what compounded, annualized rate of return did you earn?

Using the above formula again : FV = PV * (1 + n) ^ i
50000 = 11000 * (1 + n) ^ 8 ; So, n = 20.84 % (Wow!! — This is a good investment)

4. Rule of 72 (Quick!!! — )

How long does it take to double Rs 5,000 at a compound rate of 12% per year (approx.)?

Approx years to double = 72/ i% (Cool!!)

In the above case it will be = 72/ 12% = 6 years. (This is rough, Actually it will be 6.12 years)

Thus, Your ability to measure time value of money can be THE vital difference between your making a good or bad investment decision.