Tag - Personal Finance

May 2013

Understanding the various terminologies used in Debt Markets!!!

Understand the various terms in Fixed INcome, Debt Market, What is Repo Rate, Reverse Repo, Yield to Maturity, Modified Duration

.

The debt market in India consists of mainly two categories—the government securities (g-secs) markets comprising central government and state government securities, and the corporate bond market. The g-secs are the most dominant category of debt markets and form a major part of the market in terms of outstanding issues, market capitalization, and trading value.

In order to finance its fiscal deficit, the government floats fixed income instruments and borrows money by issuing g-secs that are sovereign securities issued by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) on behalf of the Government of India. The corporate bond market (also known as the non-gsec market) consists of financial institutions (FI) bonds, public sector units (PSU) bonds, and corporate bonds/debentures.

Listed below are the various terminologies used in the fixed income market:

Coupon: A coupon payment on a bond is a periodic interest payment that the bondholder receives during the time between when the bond is issued and when it matures. Coupons are normally described in terms of the coupon rate, which is calculated by adding the total amount of coupons paid per year and dividing by the bond’s face value.

Maturity: Maturity refers to the term of the bond i.e. the date on which the issuer has to repay the principal amount to the bondholder.

Yield to maturity: The Yield to maturity (YTM) is the internal rate of return or the discount rate at which the sum of all future cash flows from the bond (coupons and principal) is equal to the price of the bond. (more…)

August 2010

What and How of Nifty Index!!!

.

One of my friend recently just wanted to get an idea about Nifty and How it is calculated. I am presenting some basic facts about Nifty here….

Background of Nifty

S&P CNX Nifty is a well diversified 50 stock index accounting for 21 sectors of the economy. It is used for a variety of purposes such as benchmarking fund portfolios, index based derivatives and index funds.

S&P CNX Nifty is owned and managed by India Index Services and Products Ltd. (IISL), which is a joint venture between NSE and CRISIL. IISL is India’s first specialised company focused upon the index as a core product. IISL has a Marketing and licensing agreement with Standard & Poor’s (S&P), who are world leaders in index services.

  • The traded value for the last six months of all Nifty stocks is approximately 44.89% of the traded value of all stocks on the NSE
  • Nifty stocks represent about 58.64% of the total market capitalization as on March 31, 2008.
  • Impact cost of the S&P CNX Nifty for a portfolio size of Rs.2 crore is 0.15%
  • S&P CNX Nifty is professionally maintained and is ideal for derivatives trading

What and How of Nifty Index, How is stock selected in Index, Sensex, India Index Services and Products Ltd. (IISL)NSE, CRISIL, Liquidity,  Impact Cost, Floating Stock, index calculation

How Stocks are selected :

The constituents and the criteria for the selection judge the effectiveness of the index. Selection of the index set is based on the following criteria:

Liquidity (Impact Cost)

For inclusion in the index, the security should have traded at an average impact cost of 0.50% or less during the last six months for 90% of the observations for a basket size of Rs. 2 Crores.

Impact cost is cost of executing a transaction in a security in proportion to the weightage of its market capitalisation as against the index market capitalisation at any point of time. This is the percentage mark up suffered while buying / selling the desired quantity of a security compared to its ideal price (best buy + best sell) / 2

Floating Stock

Companies eligible for inclusion in S&P CNX Nifty should have atleast 10% floating stock. For this purpose, floating stock shall mean stocks which are not held by the promoters and associated entities (where identifiable) of such companies.

Others

a) A company which comes out with a IPO will be eligible for inclusion in the index, if it fulfills the normal eligiblity criteria for the index like impact cost, market capitalisation and floating stock, for a 3 month period instead of a 6 month period.

b) Replacement of Stock from the Index:

A stock may be replaced from an index for the following reasons:

i. Compulsory changes like corporate actions, delisting etc. In such a scenario, the stock having largest market capitalization and satisfying other requirements related to liquidity, turnover and free float will be considered for inclusion.

ii. When a better candidate is available in the replacement pool, which can replace the index stock i.e. the stock with the highest market capitalization in the replacement pool has at least twice the market capitalization of the index stock with the lowest market capitalization.

With respect to (2) above, a maximum of 10% of the index size (number of stocks in the index) may be changed in a calendar year. Changes carried out for (2) above are irrespective of changes, if any, carried out for (1) above.

And Finally how is the index calculation done

S&P CNX Nifty is computed using market capitalization weighted method, wherein the level of the index reflects the total market value of all the stocks in the index relative to a particular base period. The method also takes into account constituent changes in the index and importantly corporate actions such as stock splits, rights, etc without affecting the index value.

Source : NSE

July 2010

RBI hikes short-term rates; CRR unchanged

rbiThe central bank raised interest on Tuesday in the face of inflation has been above 10 percent for the past five months. The Reserve Bank of India said it would continue to normalize policy in line with the growth and inflation rate in the economy.


The RBI lifted the repo rate, at which it lends to banks, by 25 basis points to 5.75 percent, which was in line with expectations, but raised the reverse repo rate, at which it absorbs excess cash from the system, by a steeper than expected 50 basis points to 4.50 percent.

The central bank left the cash reserve ratio (CRR) unchanged at 6 percent.

Inflation in India emerged last year in the wake of a poor monsoon that drove up food prices but has spread broadly throughout the economy, spawning protests against a government whose voter base is predominantly poor and rural.  New Delhi’s decision to increase fuel prices is expected to add nearly a percentage point to wholesale price index (WPI) inflation starting in July and led the opposition to call a one-day nationwide strike early this month.

The government is hoping on normal summer monsoon rains to results in better crop yields and ease pressure on food prices, and has said inflation should decline to 6 percent by December, which in my opinion is a task in itself…..